Author Topic: Encounter with the BCC# instrument  (Read 1495 times)

TW

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Encounter with the BCC# instrument
« on: February 16, 2018, 01:04:59 PM »
I would like to make a few observations on my encounter with the BCC# instrument over the last 18 months.

I have been an accordionist since the 1950's, first PA then, lately - 10 years - digital 5 row.
The PA is intuitive and this, but for a developing wrist discomfort with the keyboard coupled with the burgeoning difficulty of lifting 4v/120 bass instruments, would have remained chosen.
The keyboard problem was resolved when a change to buttons was made and some adequacy with the 5 row achieved.
The music played from choice was Celtic and Ceilidh music and it had always been evident that the BCC# accordion was the root instrument for this genre so, having been too scared to take on the buttons in the 60's, my experience with the CBA encouraged a BCC# acquisition.

I didn't expect it to be easy!
I didn't expect it to be this difficult either.....

The treble side is improving but coordinating the basses (I am of course familiar with Stradella), because of the diatonic nature of the treble, is really difficult.
I have thrown in the towel on numerous occasions and put the Shand up for sale - only to find contemplation of an absolute parting with this iconic accordion too excruciating to allow as yet.
Pragmatically this will change of course.

The result of this story is that of the classic falling between two stools.
On the one hand average competancy with the small Roland 5 row and the V3 expander and it's myriad accordions and Celtic instruments (and headphones!) allows reasonable musical results but, on the other, there is the digitably unreproducible physical presence of an iconic instrument, shamed by now only producing kindergarten tunes....

Newcomers beware.
The BCC# is addictive by nature, frustrating and difficult  but will keep your synapses continually refreshed and is weighty enough to be exercise..therefore a good thing...should be prescribable...
« Last Edit: February 17, 2018, 11:47:19 PM by TW »

Fishfeathersmacteeth

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Re: Encounter with the BCC# instrument
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2018, 03:20:06 PM »
A heartfelt post that!!

We can pay tribute to the music and its instruments in many ways I think.  My take is that we do what we can. 

I'm really a Fiddle player who dabbles in Melodeon and BCC#.  I don't describe myself as a Box player.  but I can get some tunes out and enjoy it. 

As long as its not too complicated, I'll play for a few waltzes and easy marches at a dance as long as there's a chord instrument to supplement my lamentable left hand.

My point (I think) is that we are not defined by what we can do, but by what we can't.  What we can't do is constantly evolving as we learn.  Learning on an iconic instrument such as the BCC# gives new insights into Scottish music all the time for me.  Why some tunes are played in certain ways.  How the instrument lends itself to certain styles and not to others.

There is much to be learned from playing another instrument, not least about the nature of music itself.

Essentially, whatever instrument we are playing, we should first and foremost strive to be playing music.  It doesn't matter how well or ill our technique is so long as we are learning all the time.

Thank you for your thought provoking post.  I hope you continue to see value and learning in your relationship with the BCC# box!!  :)







...all the way from Luthermuir..

TW

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Re: Encounter with the BCC# instrument
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2018, 12:48:17 PM »
I'm very grateful for your comments FFMT.

I have found that exposure to the videos of accomplished (and, without exception, very helpful) players can be a two edged sword - showing what can be achieved, allowing a measure of instruction...unfortunately the downside is the inevitable comparison with ones efforts!

So your comment "Essentially, whatever instrument we are playing, we should first and foremost strive to be playing music.  It doesn't matter how well or ill our technique is so long as we are learning all the time." has made my practise chair so much more comfortable, my mistakes a matter for education rather than self reproach and engendering acceptance of the simple tunes that I can play with the hope of improvement over time.