Author Topic: Playing in F#  (Read 1262 times)

Andy

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Playing in F#
« on: March 25, 2018, 10:01:20 PM »
Not in the habit of playing in F# but having to do this in order to play along with Corries version of The Braes O' Killiecrankie.

I do make use of all 3 rows in some tunes but usually play mostly across 2 rows using the 3rd row occasionally to help with flow or bellows direction.

Been playing the F# scale and this tune in F# across the BC rows which comes fairly naturally. Also practised F# scale across CC# rows, the tune however seems harder going across these two rows.

Just wanting to check that playing it across the BC rows is an OK approach and that there is not an important reason I should be learning it across the CC# rows.

Thanks

Bill

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2018, 06:17:11 PM »
I hoped some more accomplished players might have responded to this. I would see playing in F# as a challenge and look for another solution. I've listened to a couple of Corries recordings of this tune. While one was pitched in F#, the other was in F. Makes me wonder whether any recording/replay speed changes resulted in a pitch shift. In any event, I'd use an audio editing program like Audacity to change the pitch to F or G.

roymagna

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2018, 07:24:55 PM »
Bill,  I think that using digitalisation of some  old 78 rpm records changes the original sound and the speed at which they are played. I have some 400,  78, 45 & 331/3  rpm records mainly of Sir Jimmy Shand and there is no way that the great man would have played that fast. He did play faster if requested but not by much. these digital re runs are certainly not how the great bands of yesteryear sounded. I have more modern record players and they are not as accurate the old ones, but certainly are preferable to modern CDs.
One final thought, the old 78,45 rpm etc. made the bands sound the same as they would have done if you went to a dance in the local village hall. In other words what you heard was what you got without any messing around by sound engineers who try to make how they or the Producer want it to sound.

Roy.

 
Roy

roymagna

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2018, 07:33:07 PM »
As regards playing in F# I would workout a fingering using all three rows trying not to tie my fingers up in knots ! Make prudent use of the air valve to give the desired lift and swing.
Roy.
Roy

george garside

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2018, 02:54:01 PM »
I think of playing F#  on the outside row as being akin to playing in G on the middle row but find it   easier to sometimes use the push F# on the inside row to give abetter flow to the fingering.

george

Bill

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2018, 04:35:06 PM »
That's it, George! I’ve just played 'Braes of Killiecrankie' in F#, something I'd never have thought of doing if I’d been looking at a score – 6 #s! All on the outer row plus the push F on the inner row to avoid a bellows reversal. Who said something about old dogs and new tricks?

Andy

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2018, 05:20:19 PM »
Thanks for all the useful replies.

As Bill hinted, looking at sheet music and thinking about 6 sharps could be a bit daunting but playing by ear and remembering, as George mentioned, that it is almost like playing in G just moved across a row and with only the 6th note of the scale ( E#  /  F ) having to be played differently (middle row draw or inside row push options) it is not too difficult.

Thanks again.
Andy

george garside

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2018, 08:56:16 PM »
just a reminder for anyone on here that is fairly new to the BCC# box  only 5 scales need to be learned to play in 12 keys -

C (on the row) scale  = B and C# (again on the row)

G    = F# and Ab

D  =  Eb

A  = Bb

F  = E

george

Fishfeathersmacteeth

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Re: Playing in F#
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2018, 11:11:18 AM »
..I must confess that when trying to accompany singers in an awkward key like F# I tend to play a bittie louder and force them into the nearest handy key (in this case G)... I'm sure this is very bad form... :-)
...all the way from Luthermuir..